Brent Fulton’s ‘China’s Urban Christians’ – A Book Review

China’s Urban Christians: A Light that Cannot be Hidden. By Brent Fulton. Eugene, OR, USA, Pickwick Publications 2015. Pp. ix + 145. $21.00.

China’s Urban Christians

One of the greatest forces to remould the landscape of mainland China in the last two decades has been the country’s push towards rapid urbanisation. Contrary to the measured approach the sociologist Fei Xiaotong recommended to the communist cadre, the speed of constructing and populating China’s urban centres has undoubtedly resulted in many significant societal challenges. Likewise, urbanisation has had significant consequences for the church in China which once was known as having a ‘Christianity fever’ amongst the rural poor but is now seeing a formidable force of urban intellectuals and entrepreneurs.

The volume under review addresses this complex reality. Continue reading “Brent Fulton’s ‘China’s Urban Christians’ – A Book Review”

The Legacy of K. H. Ting and Wang Weifan

This past weekend I had the privilege of offering the keynote at the AGM of the Friend of the Church in China (FCC). I was asked to speak about two figures of whom I have written about academically: K. H. Ting 丁光训 (1915–2012)1 and Wang Weifan 汪维藩 (1927–2015).2 This was an especially interesting treat as Ting gave his famous speech about the cosmic Christ at the 1991 meeting of the FCC, and I was now asked to speak about him and another key leader in the state-sanctioned Protestant church of China, the TSPM and the CCC.

Now, if you read the literature about Ting, you will encounter many strongly polarised views. Continue reading “The Legacy of K. H. Ting and Wang Weifan”

Patriotism and Christianity in China: A Reflection on the Fourth of July

thanksgiving1As today is the Fourth of July, churches throughout the United States this past weekend have been celebrating their love for their country alongside their love for their God – a strong spirit of patriotism. One recent survey reports that 61 percent of Protestant pastors in America say it is important for worship services on the weekend of the Fourth of July to incorporate patriotic elements to celebrate America’s birth, with 66 percent wanting to include special music honouring the country. In other words, American Protestants often have no problem with American patriotism.

Given that this past weekend has also had the 95th anniversary celebrations of the Communist Party of China, it is worth considering what ‘patriotism’ means for religion across the ocean. In contrast to what happens in America, many American (and Chinese) Christians are unnerved by groups in China such as the Three-Self Patriotic Movement or the Catholic Patriotic Association – state-sanctioned organisations of Christianity – and believe that the ‘true’ church is in the unregistered house churches or underground churches. Like in the US, I want to claim that most churches in China (registered or unregistered) also hold a very strong love for their country alongside their love for their God – but we should be calling this nationalism, not patriotism. Continue reading “Patriotism and Christianity in China: A Reflection on the Fourth of July”

(Dis)unity in the Church in China

Rev Joseph GuWhen I was first interested in Christianity in China, the Protestant terrain was laid out very clearly to me. There are two churches in China: (1) the true and faithful house churches who’s members endure persecution to live the faith and (2) the Three-Self churches who’s members are not really Christians because they have compromised the gospel to communism. Over time, I have come to realise that these characterisations are far from representative of these two groups, and a lot of good can come out of discarding them.1 Continue reading “(Dis)unity in the Church in China”

‘Christianity and Religions in China: Past Present Future’ – Call for Papers

The ecumenical Ecclesiological Investigations International Research Network invites you to its tenth annual international conference which will take place in Hong Kong, China, between July 20-24, 2016. The main program will take place at Ming Hua Theological College and other ecumenical partners in Hong Kong. There will also be cultural and religious events incorporated as part of the main program.

The conference takes as its theme the multi-faceted topic of ‘Christianity and Religions in China: Past Present Future’ and will run from Wednesday 20-Sunday 24 July 2016. The event will explore interchurch issues, intra-church issues, interfaith issues and issues concerning interaction and dialogue between the wider world and societies in which faith communities live out their existence. While the primary focus will be very much on the Chinese context, presentations on Christianity and religion in Asia in general and in other Asian contexts are also most welcome.

The call for papers is due 31 January 2016. For more information, see the official meeting website.

Chinese Christianities Mailing List

This past weekend at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion, we had the inaugural session of the new Chinese Christianities program unit. I have since created a mailing list for the group and related matters on Chinese Christianities.

To subscribe to our mailing list, please send an email to sympa@mlist.is.ed.ac.uk with nothing in the body of the message and the following in the ‘Subject’ line (replacing ‘Your Name’ with your real name):

SUBSCRIBE chinese-christianities Your Name

China establishing ‘new’ Christian theology?

Haidian Church (Easter 2013)

News articles are coming out today echoing a curious news piece that showed up on the China Daily yesterday entitled ‘China plans establishment of Christian theology’.1 The China Daily is an English-language newspaper that acts as the mouthpiece of the government (of course, no media outlet is unbiased). The article starts with a curious quote by the director of the State Administration for Religious Affairs saying: Continue reading “China establishing ‘new’ Christian theology?”

‘The Shaping of Christianity in China’ – Call for Papers

The Shaping of Christianity in China:
A fresh look at the contribution of indigenous Christians

Oxford Centre for Mission Studies, 21-22 May 2015
Deadline: 31 December 2014

Several scholars have agreed to lend their support to an initiative from Dr Peter Rowan, the UK National Director of OMF International, to hold a two-day conference at the Oxford Centre for Mission Studies (OCMS), Woodstock Road, Oxford, in Spring 2015, to mark the 150 years since the foundation of the China Inland Mission/OMF. Among those supporting this initiative are Dr Patrick Fung (General Director OMF, Singapore), Dr Tom Harvey (OCMS), Professor David Killingray (School of Advanced Study, University of London), Professor Gary Tiedemann (Shandong University, formerly SOAS, London), Professor Charles Weber (Wheaton College, IL), Dr Paul Woods (OCMS), and Dr Zheng Yangwen (University of Manchester). Continue reading “‘The Shaping of Christianity in China’ – Call for Papers”

New Calvinism in China?

John CalvinThere is a growing recognition by the media and by scholars that Calvinism is growing in China these days.1  The news has gained the attention of a number of Americans, particularly since the 16th century Reformer John Calvin is likewise having a comeback in the US in the so-called ‘New Calvinism‘ movement.2  At least one scholar has called the movement in China ‘Chinese New Calvinism’.3  Unfortunately, I think this view is problematic.

You can read my own interpretation more fully in an academic article I just published on Calvinism in China,4 but I wanted to summarise my basic points here, since I think it is an important distinction: Continue reading “New Calvinism in China?”