Understanding and Misunderstanding between the Far East and the West – Call for Papers

Understanding and Misunderstanding between the Far East and the West
Conference on East Asian studies in Remembrance of 210th Anniversary of Dr. Rev. Robert Morrison’s Arrival at China

13–14th October 2017, University of Glasgow
Deadline: 1st May 2017 11th June 2017

Robert Morrison, the first Protestant missionary to China and the Far East, had contribution not only to the evangelisation, but also the study of East Asian studies and even the modernisation of Far East. When Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox missionaries had freer entrance to China (from 1842 to 1949), Japan and Korea, transcultural communication was strengthened, which resulted in not only understanding but also misunderstanding. How do such understanding and misunderstanding affect the West and the Far East in 19th and 20th century? This inter-disciplinary conference aims to explore the question in different aspects so to acknowledge and recognise the academic contributions by the Christian missionaries in the Far East in the 210th anniversary of Dr. Rev. Robert Morrison’s arrival at China. Continue reading “Understanding and Misunderstanding between the Far East and the West – Call for Papers”

AAR 2017: Chinese Christianities Seminar – Call for Papers

AAR

American Academy of Religion, 2017 Annual Meeting
Chinese Christianities Seminar – Call for Papers
Deadline for proposals: 1 March 2017

This seminar provides a collaborative forum for scholars of different disciplines to engage in an academic discourse about the field of Chinese Christianities. Christianity is the fastest growing religion in mainland China today, and arguably the religion of choice for a growing number of diasporic Chinese. “Chinese” is an expansive term, including mainland China proper as well as a large, linguistically, and culturally diverse diaspora, and encompassing more than a fifth of the world’s population; the Han Chinese people are sometimes described as the world’s largest ethnic group. Hence, with the increasing critical mass of Chinese Christians, there has likewise been a growing academic interest in various instantiations of Chinese Christianities, as understood across geographies (e.g., mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Southeast Asia, North America, etc.) and groupings (e.g., house and state-sanctioned churches, Catholic, Pentecostal, etc.). Chinese Christianities both transcend and hinder a number of regional, social, religious, etc. boundaries. Over the course of these five years, this seminar will offer a unique opportunity for scholars to engage and to debate the implications of the multiplicity of Chinese Christianities with regards to the boundaries they engage.

Developing the overarching theme of “Chinese Christianities” and building on the success of our first two years, this third year of the seminar will focus on various religious boundaries. We welcome papers in the following or related areas:
Continue reading “AAR 2017: Chinese Christianities Seminar – Call for Papers”

Brent Fulton’s ‘China’s Urban Christians’ – A Book Review

China’s Urban Christians: A Light that Cannot be Hidden. By Brent Fulton. Eugene, OR, USA, Pickwick Publications 2015. Pp. ix + 145. $21.00.

China’s Urban Christians

One of the greatest forces to remould the landscape of mainland China in the last two decades has been the country’s push towards rapid urbanisation. Contrary to the measured approach the sociologist Fei Xiaotong recommended to the communist cadre, the speed of constructing and populating China’s urban centres has undoubtedly resulted in many significant societal challenges. Likewise, urbanisation has had significant consequences for the church in China which once was known as having a ‘Christianity fever’ amongst the rural poor but is now seeing a formidable force of urban intellectuals and entrepreneurs.

The volume under review addresses this complex reality. Continue reading “Brent Fulton’s ‘China’s Urban Christians’ – A Book Review”

The Legacy of K. H. Ting and Wang Weifan

This past weekend I had the privilege of offering the keynote at the AGM of the Friend of the Church in China (FCC). I was asked to speak about two figures of whom I have written about academically: K. H. Ting 丁光训 (1915–2012)1 and Wang Weifan 汪维藩 (1927–2015).2 This was an especially interesting treat as Ting gave his famous speech about the cosmic Christ at the 1991 meeting of the FCC, and I was now asked to speak about him and another key leader in the state-sanctioned Protestant church of China, the TSPM and the CCC.

Now, if you read the literature about Ting, you will encounter many strongly polarised views. Continue reading “The Legacy of K. H. Ting and Wang Weifan”